Oklahoma State University - Tulsa
Oklahoma State University - Tulsa

News Alert:

Ranji Vaidyanathan, Ph.D., P.E.

Raj N. Singh, Sc.D.

Varnadow Professor of Materials Science and Engineering
Graduate Program Coordinator
School of Materials Science and Engineering
Courtesy appointment in School of Chemical Engineering

Helmerich Research Center
Oklahoma State University
700 North Greenwood Avenue, HRC-200
Tulsa, OK 74106-0700

Office Phone: 918-594-8645
Cell Phone: 405-338-8999
Fax: 918-594-8628
vaidyan@okstate.edu or tulmsegr@okstate.edu



Research

Interests - NGML - Activities

Research Interests

  • Manufacturing scale-up and product development for large composite parts for aerospace and energy sectors
  • Interlaminar modification of polymer and ceramic composites for improved toughness and energy absorption using nano-sized fillers
  • Recycling of materials into high-value engineered products (carpet, foam, tires, composites)
  • Structure-property relationships (Mechanical, Electrical, Magnetic, Thermoelectric, Biological etc.) of composite materials
  • Nanotechnology for energy and biomedical applications
  • Rapid manufacturing and rapid prototyping of advanced engineering materials

top of page top

Next Generation Materials Laboratory

The mission of the Next Generation Materials Laboratory (NGML) at Oklahoma State University is to develop a multi-disciplinary research laboratory for excellence in next generation advanced composite materials for aerospace and energy industries.

  • Product development to benefit small and medium manufacturers, users in the aerospace and energy sectors; research related to development of new advanced processes for next generation multi-functional composite materials
  • Education and training of graduate and undergraduate students by involvement in research programs of practical and theoretical interest to producers, users and equipment manufacturers of next generation multi-functional composite materials
  • Development of national and international forum for the products, users and equipment manufacturers of next generation multi-functional composite materials
  • Technology transfer of products and processes to assist in enterprise development and economic development in Tulsa and Oklahoma

 top of page top

Research activities

The Next Generation Materials Laboratory (NGML) is a part of the Helmerich Research Center and the newly established School of Materials Science and Engineering at the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology (CEAT) at Oklahoma State University, Tulsa campus. Present and past research activities are described below.

Present
  • All-composite tanks for adsorbed natural gas: The goal of this project is to develop a manufacturing process for low-pressure adsorbed natural gas tanks using high-adsorption capable materials. The research will also develop high adsorption materials that will provide high volume all-composite tanks. This project is funded by a National Science Foundation Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) project and an Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST) Oklahoma Applied Research Support (OARS) project. We are working with an Oklahoma manufacturer on this project – CleanNG LLC.
  • Interlaminar modification with nano-fillers for improvement of interlaminar fracture toughness in polymer and ceramic composites: The goal of this project is to modify the interlaminar area through the use of nano-fillers such as graphene oxide and polyhedral Oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) in very small quantities (<0.2% by wt. of the composite) to obtain 100-250% improvement. Currently, we are studying the exact nature of this modification and the types of chemical bonds responsible for this modification. This project is funded through internal funds.
  • Nano-structured thermoelectric composites for energy harvesting: The goal of this project is to develop a manufacturing process for thermoelectric devices based on bismuth telluride that can be attached to any structural component to take advantage of the temperature difference between the hot and cold side of the component. The thermoelectric devices will be manufactured using thick-film nanostructured thermoelectric materials recently developed at OSU and further hydrogenated by for enhancing the device efficiency. This project is funded by an Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST) Oklahoma Applied Research Support (OARS) project. We are working with an Oklahoma manufacturer – Amethyst Research Inc.
  • Reusable biocompatible polymers: The goal of this project is to develop a set of reusable biocompatible polymers that will maintain its strength, texture and barrier properties after sterilization or boiling in water. A Riata Faculty Fellowship from the Riata Center for Entrepreneurship at the Spears School of Business, Oklahoma State University has funded this project.
Past
  • All-composite tanks for compressed natural gas: The goal of this project was to develop a manufacturing process for lightweight high-pressure compressed natural gas tanks that do not have a liner. The composite tanks can be filled to store the natural gas at higher pressures than current state of the art tanks (<3600 psi) that would allow higher volumes of gas to be stored at lower volumes and tank weights. We have assisted our small business partner CleanNG LLC to produce these tanks. These tanks have recently successfully passed the Federal Motor Vehicles Safety Standard (FMVSS) 304 that included cycling, maximum pressure and surviving a bonfire of a filled CNG tank. This project was funded by an Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST) Oklahoma Applied Nanotechnology (ONAP) project. We are working with an Oklahoma manufacturer on this project – CleanNG LLC.
  • Composites from post-consumer carpet for infrastructure and composite tooling applications: The goal of this project was to develop a manufacturing process for the recycling of carpet-based materials into high-value added engineering materials for infrastructure and composite tooling applications. These composite materials can convert post-consumer carpet into products without the use of expensive, energy intensive processes. We developed a modified vacuum assisted resin transfer process to achieve this goal. These composite materials are 60% lighter than concrete and 10 times better sound absorbing than concrete while being cheaper. Additionally, this enables the removal and re-use of a material that is high-volume and non-biodegradable. This project was funded by an Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST) Oklahoma Applied Research Support (OARS) project. We are working with an Oklahoma manufacturer – KT Plastics Inc.

top of page top

 

 

OSU-Tulsa on Facebook OSU-Tulsa on Twitter OSU-Tulsa on Foursquare OSU-Tulsa on You Tube